Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the following

Somethings you should always remembers before you go for ride.
Did I forget anything ? Let us all know

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bearqst
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Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the following

#1 Post by bearqst » Wed Nov 05, 2003 2:35 pm

*dry matches and fire starter
*metal cup-for boiling water
*extra food items
*sleeping bag, ground pad and space blanket
*tent
*spare socks, gloves, hat and face mask
*first aid kit
*trail maps & compass
*ax or handsaw, and sharp knife
*equipment repair items and spare parts
*white gas for cook stoves and lanterns
*spare lantern mantles and candles
*snowshoes in winter time



greg

#2 Post by greg » Sat Nov 08, 2003 4:18 pm

you forgot to mention some type of firearm...



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#3 Post by john » Sat Nov 08, 2003 6:32 pm

Good point for a long trip. As a rule I carry a pistol with me, but I know a lot of guys who don't.

Guess they figure their sleds are faster than their riding partners... :wink:



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#4 Post by denali wide track » Thu Aug 19, 2004 6:08 pm

:shock:
You forgot to mention a small shovel (the kind that folds up and is real nice and handy to dig up a super wide track out of deeeeep powdery snow) and flares. Cell phones don't always work in this area (Cantwell). I speak from experience, was on EMT ambulance crew in Cantwell, and locating snowmobilers in trouble can be quite a challenge, especially in the dark. Definitely fill out a Wilderness Trip Plan and leave it with a friend before you go.
We sure look forward to winter, only stuff that's been falling from the skies lately is wood ashes, temps 80 in the shade yesterday.



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ABS Backpack

#5 Post by YamahaMountain » Fri Nov 24, 2006 9:34 pm

I found this on another site I'm on. About $800 US ( I think ) Might be something to look into, I know I'm going to get one
when I get the money. They have some videos that demonstrate how they work, check it out if you get a chance,

http://www.abssystem.com/


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#6 Post by john » Sat Nov 25, 2006 9:06 am

Interesting product. I'd like to see more info on it though. Their site has a few conflicting statements. But it is a good thought, floating on top rather than being buried.

The handle and having to activate the system might be a bit combersome on a sled.



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#7 Post by JDL » Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:01 am

Guess they figure their sleds are faster than their riding partners... Wink
Well when you ride with the cat guys, we are all faster then you! ))


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90% of all Arctic Cats are still out on the mountains/trails today.

The other 10% actaully made it back home!

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#8 Post by john » Sat Nov 25, 2006 1:20 pm

O Pooooor boy, we run into a moose on the trail and I'll hold my shot while you out run him ;)

Ooops, forgot, they won't let you drive your trailer on the trails... :twisted:



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#9 Post by YamahaMountain » Sat Nov 25, 2006 7:57 pm

I'm going to look into it some more when I get back and have more access to the net. I've also heard of another one called the Avalanche shoot? or something like that it opens up and its supose to help pull you to the top of the snow. Its just something to look into, may never need it but at the same time it may be piece of mind knowing its there if I need it to be.


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#10 Post by Alaskaman100 » Thu Dec 06, 2007 12:42 pm

Definately a shovel. The lexan avalanche shovels are compact, unbreakable and cheap. Yes, you can dig yourself out by hand but then you are all wet and sweaty when you are done and just begging for hypothermia. In a pinch you can tunnel into the side of a drift with it and get out of the wind.

If you think you might have to spend the night, don't depend on fires, pack a stove and fuel. Learn how to use it in the garage, not in an emergency.



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#11 Post by john » Thu Dec 06, 2007 7:26 pm

I like the light metal shovel. In a pinch I figure I can start a fire on it for warmth.

I'm also sold on the Jet Boil, but the cup that comes with it isn't good in real cold weather for heating water.



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Re: Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the followin

#12 Post by john » Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:38 pm

OK, the last two trips reminded me that I needed to update and post my survival gear pack. The M sled doesn't carry as much as the old Panther, but I can get my list in a regular sized sled bag for it and my SOS pack.

I also Vacuum Seal as much as possible to help compact everything and keep it dry.

SOS Back Pack
Transceiver/Beacon
Probe
Shovel
Map and Compass
GPS
Knifes (2 - one pocket one 6 " blade)
Pistol (45 Minimum), extra clip
LED Flashlight
LED headlamp
2 Flares
Mirror
Reflective material
High energy food bars
Water bottles
Six Packs Energen-C
Survival Cans (Arctic Fire)
Boullon cubes (vacuum sealed)
Gum
Paper Towels (vacuum sealed)
Tin Foil (vacuum sealed)
Toliet Paper (vacuum sealed)
Extra Gloves, socks, head cover, face gator (Vacumm Sealed)
First Aid Kit (Large roll up kit from Arctic Fire)
Tow Strap
100' 3/8 Rope
550 Cord
Waterproof matches (vacuum sealed)
Lighter(s)
Steel Wool (lights with Battery)
Flint and Steel
Lint (from clothes dryer, vacuum sealed)
Candles
Fire Starter Bars
Florescent tape
Tape, Duck and Elec.
Bailing Wire
Zip Ties
Goggles
Zip Lock Bags
Space blanket
Cell/Sat Phone
Chemical Hand/Foot Warmers
Military Pup Tent (Vacuum Sealed)
Gerber folding saw
MSR Pocket Stove
Trash Bags
extra batteries
Extra Gas
Snow Shoes

Tool Kit with::

Screwdrivers
Pliers
Wrenches
Rags
Litter bags
Electrical/ duct tape
Starter cord
Spark plugs
Spark plug socket
Drive belt
Wire
Latex gloves

Some extra items to consider:

SnowBuddy, Pro http://buddytow.com
5 feet of clear 1/4" fuel hose
Last edited by john on Mon Apr 06, 2009 2:30 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Updated



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Re: Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the followin

#13 Post by larry morris » Fri Nov 30, 2012 3:56 pm

Hi everyone,
Thought I would make this post current for general information to those wanting to put together their own survival pack.



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Re: Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the followin

#14 Post by Summit800 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 4:41 pm

Why a .45 minimum?

I cant think of a situation where a .38 wouldnt be more that adequate.



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Re: Emergency & Survival Gear, be sure to carry the followin

#15 Post by john » Sat Dec 01, 2012 2:48 pm

The difference between the two (besides the caliber) is the impact energy that the bullet has. The .45 has greater impact energy because it is a larger bullet. Unfortunately, it also has greater recoil when fired.

The .38 is a good round because it has lower recoil making it easier to shoot. It is also smaller, making weapons that use it smaller than most .45's. However, the .38 has never been able to be effectively used in an automatic pistol (IMHO).

The .45 is a better weapon if you need a heavier bullet with more impact energy that can be fired effectively from an automatic pistol. It is also available as a revolver but these are not common. And being a heavier round, the .45 will penetrate further. I like the penetration of the 45 for what I consider to be the most likely situation to occur on winter trails, an encounter with a moose or possible survival needs where more stopping power would be beneficial.

During the summer months I carry a 44 mag for the same reason with anticipation of needing it to stop more aggressive and physically healthier animals. I don't carry my 44 mag on my sled do to size when I'm also geared up in layers, which is not the case in the summer on my ATV.

I know there are others on here with more knowledge and experience and would like to hear their thoughts as well.



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